Featured__ Six Moves To Improve Your Balance

August 10, 2015 | By

If you’re getting a little bit tired of toppling over every time you go to dinner in heels, you might need to work on your balance. One way to do that is by practicing yoga regularly, but you can also incorporate moves into your daily workout routine that will help you stay on your feet. Try working a few of these Six Moves To Improve Your Balance into your next weight training session to build muscle and improve balance. 

Single-Leg Deadlift
It’s a pretty safe bet that any move done on one leg will help you work on your balance. A single-leg deadlift is done just the same as a normal deadlift, but with one leg extended behind you when you bend down. This move will tone your glutes and hammies as well.

Curtsy Lunge
A curtsy lunge works your entire lower body and helps with balance. All you have to do is balance on one leg and step the other leg back behind you as if you were going to do a curtsy, then lower your body down and push yourself back up. Lift one leg out to the side when you come up for even more balance practice.

Squats
We really love a good squat. Any move that works your legs and glutes is going to help with balance since those are the muscles that help stabilize you. It doesn’t really matter what kind of squat you do, so pick your favorite and get to it. 

Ab Work
The best way to keep yourself balanced is by building a strong core. You can do any combination of ab work that you like, but planks are especially great for strengthening your core and improving your balance. Bonus if you can keep one leg lifted in the air!

Calf Raises
Heel lovers, this one is for you. Strong calf muscles will help to keep you upright when wearing those 6-inch heels. Jogging or walking on an incline is great for building calf muscle, but for a little extra boost, try doing some calf raises to finish off your next leg workout. 

Single-Leg Lunge
Not only does this move build muscle in your glutes, thighs and calves, it also takes lots of balance. Rest the top of one foot on an elevated surface like a chair or couch, then perform a static lunge.

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