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Spectating Barbour and adidas Originals have teamed up for a collaboration of footwear and outerwear. The collection is centered on three themes: Country, Spectator and Military. Country, drawing on Barbour's countryside heritage, features the TS Runners and Adiwick jacket in 8oz beeswax and leather. Spectator, honoring the long association adidas has with sport, includes the ZX555 and CLMBA and two jackets made of lycra and waxed cotton. And the third, Military, features the Baradi jacket and the GSG9 boot. See more of adidas Originals x Barbour F/W '14 collection below.

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It's all in the details. Vans and Liberty Arts Fabric are taking a fourth victory lap with their new collaboration. The Vans x Liberty Art Fabrics holiday collection features five iconic Vans' silhouettes, covered in detailed prints and patterns from Liberty’s extensive fabric archive. Editions of the Era, Old Skool and Sk8-Hi Reissue are available in traditional unisex sizes alongside the Authentic and Classic Slip-On, which are being made just for women. The Vans x Liberty Art Fabrics holiday collection will be available October at Vans retail locations, vans.com and Liberty of London on Regent Street. See the entire collection below.

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Fall foliage Even though one of them is clearly the most popular, there are so many different camo prints to choose from. For their new collab, Carhartt WIP and Vans looked back to the '5os. The Camo Mitchell pattern was first used in 1953 by United States Marine Corps. And now it adorns the classic Vans Era. The Carhartt WIP x Vans Classics Era is available as of today (August 27) both in-store and online. There is also Camo Mitchell apparel, bag and accessories to snatch up. See more of Carhartt WIP x Vans Classics Era below.

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When peer pressure is a-ok. Peer pressure generally leads to things that aren't that great for you. The "one" more drink has gotten us more than once.  Well, new research says you can peer pressure your friends into exercising longer and harder. The paper was published in the journal Psychology of Sport and Exercise. Psychologist Christian Jarrett has summarized the findings for the British Psychological Society’s Research Digest. Jarret writes:
Sixty-eight regulars (nine men) at a Pilates studio were asked to perform two plank exercises, and to hold each for as long as they possibly could. The participants were given a three-minute rest between each attempt. The key intervention is that between planks, half the participants were given the "social norms" message that 80 per cent of people similar to them (in terms of age, gender and Pilates level) had achieved a 20 per cent longer time on their second effort. The other participants were told nothing of this kind, or anything else.
Participants held the plank position twice. The second time, they were told their peers could hold the plank longer, and voila the peer pressure worked. Participants held their second pose 5 percent longer than their first try. The second group who wasn't told anything, dropped by 18%. So go ahead and let the peer pressure roll. We just hope you use it for the more beneficial things. Most of the time. Spotted via: NY Mag

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Would Tony Yayo approve? We hate to be alarmists, but the nicer weather is almost through and it's time to go out with a Bermuda. Amsterdam's Patta has (again) teamed up with Kangol to release a some hats. Knitted in Kangol’s trademarked bouclé yard, the Patta x Kangol Bermud Hats feature alternating Kangol Kangaroo and Patta logos stitched around the side crown and contrasting top buttons. The Patta x Kangol Bermuda Casual Hats will be available in navy and light blue at Patta on August 23rd and online the following week. See more below.

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Documenting censorship in the Information Age. In the spring of 2014, father Wyatt Neumann took his 2-year-old daughter Stella with him on a road trip. As any father would do, he documented their journey in pictures. While on this trip, a hyper puritanical, neo-conservative group launched a cyber attack on the photographic works. They went as far as to shut down his Facebook, Instagram, and attempting to shut down his website. They even started a webpage about him and his seemingly “perverse” images. "This show, and this work, details a stark contrast between two very different ideologies and worldviews in both America and abroad. One is open minded, proud and expressive. Unafraid. The other is far more conservative; a point of view bent on shame, and the manipulations of people’s freedoms based on subjective will," Neumann says. "My children are free, they live without shame." Wyatt Neumann's “I FEEL SORRY FOR YOUR CHILDREN – the sexualization of innocence in america” is open from now until August 21st. Safari Gallery 355 West Broadway New York, NY See some more photos from the exhibit below.

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