News__ Kickin’ it Old School

August 31, 2009 | By

If you're a make-up addict, you can pretty much spend an entire day roaming the isles of Duane Reade, Sephora or any cosmetics department for that matter. With hours lost, the mission is never ending--on the search for the perfect miracle product that actually works, smells pretty (in some cases) and is good value for money. It’s possible to get lost in the masses of new cosmetic products, but there will always be products that have stood the test of time. Not only are some of them the originals, but all of them work as brilliantly as the day they turned up fresh on the store shelf. Here are five beauty products that are totally old school but compete with the best.

And also, some old ad campaigns to enjoy.

Revlon Nail Enamel

First released in the 1930’s, the formula is chip-resistant with the help of proteins. Complete coverage with one coat, the range comes in over 60 shades today.

Chanel No.5 eau de parfum

One of the top selling fragrances in the world today, it was first introduced in 1921. You can’t go wrong if you want a piece of sophistication without falling behind on rent. A classy and timeless scent.

Maybelline's Great Lash Mascara

Still a true make-up artist favorite, this little gem first came out in 1971. It’s blacker than a lot high-end mascaras. For hygiene reasons, mascara should be replaced every 6 months.

Elizabeth Arden, kicking it old school.

Elizabeth Arden Eight Hour Cream Skin Protectant

Vaseline on steroids. This life saver came out in 1932 and helped Sir Edmund Hillary combat wind burn when he climbed Mount Everest in 1953. True story. Helps flaky skin, dry lips and elbows and awesome for an airplane beauty treatment.

Vintage Bourjois write-up.

Bourjois Blushes come with a cute brush!

Bourjois Blush

Super fresh looking blush that smells amazing. Alexander Napoleon Bourjois wanted to up the blush game by creating the first powder blush and having ladies move into the future and leave behind the berries in the fruit salad way back in 1863.

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