News__ NEVERMIND THE BABY

July 28, 2011 | By

Twenty years later, Nirvana's album art offends

What is so offensive about an iconic album cover that shows a naked baby? To most, probably nothing. In fact, the cover of Nirvana's Nevermind has been shown in record stores, magazines and even our personal collections for the last 20 years. Baby Spencer Elden's penis. No big deal. It's art, right? Wrong. Yesterday, the official Nirvana Facebook page posted a photo of the iconic album cover to promote the 20th anniversary box set which will be released in the coming weeks. Facebook administrators immediately took down the photo claiming, "Facebook does not allow photos that attack an individual or group, or that contain nudity, drug use, violence or other violations of the Terms of Use."

Now, suddenly the photo is back up, and according to NME, Facebook is pretending like it never happened:

"The photo on the cover of 'Nevermind' album does not actually violate Facebook's terms. Facebook does allow photos of naked children 'that are clearly unable to stand on their own' in a non sexual situation – so in other words, babies. Why? Put it this way - if a parent wanted to share some photos of a newborn with their grandparents, we wouldn't want them to not be able to share them on Facebook."

How is this photo, an image we have all seen a million times and has now become a cultural symbol, offensive to Facebook yet photos of a high school gang-bang rape managed to find their way into the social networking site with no problems? That doesn't make sense. How is it that groups like The D.E.N.N.I.S. System (which took a joke from the popular show It's Always Sunny in Philadelphia and turned it into a forum for sexual violence and misogyny) and Panties Free continue to exist? Get it together, Facebook.

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